Thursday, January 17, 2013

Beware the Slow Loris

These are small and nocturnal creatures that are found in Southeast Asia, belonging to one group among eight species of Strepsirrhini (sub-order) primates. The slow loris with scientific name (Nycticebus) is a primate genus closely related to the lemur. Using their distinctive face masks or markings, scientists are able to slowly determine the kind or species. Some have unique striking eye patches that extend below the chin area which surprisingly did not come from Borneo.

Because of these facemasks distinctions, it resulted into the identification of four other species of Bornean and Philippine Lorises namely Nycticebus Menagensis, Nycticebus Bancanus, Nycticebus Borneanus and Nycticebus Kayan.
Slow Loris
Generally, slow rises have round heads, large eyes, and narrow snouts and have different coloration patterns that can be detected depending on the species where it belongs. Their trunk is long which gives them the ability to twist and turn and transfer from one tree branch to another while their arms and legs are almost the same length.

Most mammals do not have poison however slor lorises have a toxic bite which is kind of area to the species it belongs. The toxin that it produces comes from primarily licking a gland on their arm and the secretion mixes with its saliva to further boost its toxicity level. This is their way of protecting themselves from predators in the wild. On the other hand, while protecting their young, the toxin is spread over the fur while grooming so that no predators would be enticed to make the infant their meal.

Out of the 8 identified species, all five species are already considered as “endangered” or “vulnerable” due to habitat loss and wildlife trade. They often move slowly and discretely to keep predators away trying hard to keep quiet and usually freezes when threatened or attacked. They are known to eat small animals, insects, fruits and other vegetation making them omnivores.

Slow Loris Video

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