Friday, September 21, 2012

Snakes and Traveling

Snakes and traveling are two words which don’t often come together in one sentence, but the instances of pet snakes having to relocate or travel with their owners are known to exist.

The 2006 movie Snakes on a Plane starring Samuel L Jackson may have overlooked certain facts linked with snakes and air travel, but as a film it did manage to rake in a significant number of followers, if not for the presence of Samuel L Jackson being in the movie.
But as “natural” as snakes were in the film, traveling with snakes is actually no joking matter, with significant preparations in the part of pet snake owners required for them to undertake before actually getting on board a plane.

After all, all pets – snakes included – tend to get quite stressed when traveling, and ensuring that they are at their most calm of moods is important.

As there is an estimated 2,700 different snake species, a general set of guidelines involving snakes and travel is known to prevail, though there are particular species which require certain treatments or preparations geared to make them more comfortable.

Going to the vet first remains to be a good first step when there are plans to travel with one’s pet snake, with a qualified vet looking into how fit a snake is for a trip. A visit to the vet would also clarify concerns related to proper temperature requirements for snakes, along with ideal feeding frequencies/schedules.

Since snakes are cold-blooded, temperatures must be maintained at degrees which are amply warm enough, not too warm. Generally, snakes are okay with 75 to 80 degree temperatures, but getting the ideal temperature reading for a specific type of snake is still highly advised.

With regards feeding frequencies, a visit to the vet will also clarify when the ideal time to feed a snake is, as well as how much food and water they should be given. Informing the vet of how long the trip would is important, and allowing for travel delay allowances should also be added into the mix.

All in all, snakes should be kept in enclosures which they can’t easily escape from too, to avoid further problems one a plane takes off.

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